Historic Preservation Commission Text Changes

Print

The following are the proposed changes the Beaufort Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) is requesting to their "Design Guidelines for the Beaufort Historic District & Landmarks," 1994, Revised 2008. They are in table form indicating the columns on the right are directly from the existing text and the changes to the text are in the left hand column. The entire text can be found by clicking here. The changes, some in red, can be found here or below. A printed copy of the changes is also available at Town Hall, 701 Front Street, Beaufort, NC, in the Planning and Inspections Office and can be viewed between 8:00 AM-5:00 PM Monday-Friday.

A public hearing on these changes will be held on February 2, 2016,  at 6:00 PM, at the Train Depot, 614 Broad Street, Beaufort, NC. Public comment will be taken during this meeting and if able, this item will be forwarded to the Board of Commissioners March meeting for another public hearing and adoption by the Board of Commissioners.

These changes do include some grammatical changes but not all for the Design Guidelines. The following are the proposed changes the HPC is requesting for the February 2, 2016 Public Hearing:

Page #

Existing Guidelines

Commission Recommended Changes

53-54

Preservation of Wood Siding (3rd paragraph)

These guidelines seek to maintain the district’s character by requiring the preservation of the existing historic wood siding and trim elements and ensuring that true wood siding and trim (not particle board, Masonite, or pressed wood products) are used on all restorations and rehabilitations unless there is an overwhelming reason to do otherwise.

Preservation of Wood Siding (3rd paragraph)

These guidelines seek to maintain the district’s character by requiring the preservation of the existing historic wood siding and trim elements and ensuring that true wood siding and trim(not particle board, Masonite, or pressed wood products)or other applicable materials approved by the Commission are used on all restorations and rehabilitations unless there is an overwhelming reason to do otherwise.

55

Wood Siding, Trim, and Ornament Guidelines

6.2.3 Replace historic wood elements only where the original is too deteriorated to repair. If replacement is necessary, use new replacement wood that matches the original as closely as possible in all properties: shape, profile, texture, and detailing. The deteriorated or damaged condition should be documented. Replacement of these features in kind and according to the guidelines does not normally require a COA.

Wood Siding, Trim, and Ornament Guidelines

6.2.3 Replace historic wood elements only where the original is too deteriorated to repair. If replacement is necessary, use new replacement wood or other applicable materials approved by the Commission that matches the original as closely as possible in all properties: shape, profile, texture, and detailing. The deteriorated or damaged condition should be documented. Replacement of these features in kind and according to the guidelines does not normally require a COA.

55

6.2.7 Avoid replacing clapboard siding with shingle siding (or visa versa) or replacing clapboard siding with siding of a different width or profile, particularly if the later siding has gained historic significance in its own right.

6.2.7 Avoid replacing clapboard siding with shingle siding (orvisavice versa) or replacing clapboard siding with siding of a different width or profile, particularly if the later siding has gained historic significance in its own right.

55

6.2.9 The use of imitation or pressed wood, vinyl, or aluminum siding is not permitted.

6.2.9 The use of imitation or pressed wood, vinyl, or aluminum siding or trim is not permitted.

55

6.2.10 The HPC may allow the replacement of existing substitute siding with new substitute siding (such as cement fiber siding) if the proposed replacement will be more in keeping with the original appearance of the structure. Substitute siding with a simulated wood grain will not be permitted.

6.2.10 The HPC may allow the replacement of existing substitute siding with new substitute siding(such as cement fiber siding)if the proposed replacement will be more in keeping with the original appearance of the structure.Substitute siding with a simulated wood grain will not be permitted.

56

6.2.14 Blowned in insulation should be placed in a house so as not to disturb siding.

6.2.14 Blowned inBlown-in insulation should be placed in a house so as not to disturb siding.

56

Substitute Wood Siding Policy

The elements of the coastal environment have always been harsh on wood siding and as a result a number of substitute materials have been developed. Some of these new materials may be appropriate for use on houses in the historic district depending on the position of the new siding in relation to the street. Any substitute material siding must have the surfact texture, surface reflectivity, and finish of wood.

The use of vinyl, aluminum, and pressed wood as a cosmetic cladding is not appropriate.

The use of fiber cement siding may be approved for new structures, non-historic structures and additions to historic structures not visible from public streets or waterways. When fiber cement is used it must have the smooth side out and have the same size exposure as the siding in the rest of the building. Fiber cement siding may be used in areas that have been proven to be prone to excessive rotting.

In the case of structures that are presently covered with vinyl, aluminum, and pressed wood cosmetic cladding, the HPC may allow for a change to another substitute siding (such as fiber cement siding), if the proposed new siding is more in keeping with original appearance of the structure or the character of the district.

1. The appearance, surface textures, details, and other key visual characteristics of most substitute sidings are not appropriate in the historic district.

2. Vinyl, Aluminum and Pressed wood shall not be used to cover or replace wood siding or brick structures that contribute to the character of the Historic District, or on new structures.

Substitute Wood Siding Policy

The elements of the coastal environment have always been harsh on wood siding and as a result,a number of substitute materials have been developed. Some of these new materials may be appropriate for use on houses in the historic district depending on the position of the new siding in relation to the street. Any substitute material siding must have thesurfactsurface texture, surface reflectivity, and finish of wood.

The use of vinyl, aluminum, and pressed wood as a cosmetic cladding is not appropriate.

The use of fiber cement siding may be approved for new structures, non-historic structures and additions to historic structures not visible from public streets or waterways. When fiber cement siding is used it must have thesmooth side out and havesame thickness, texture, andthe same sizeexposure as the sidinginon the rest of the building. Fiber cement siding may be used in areas that have been proven to be prone to excessive rotting.

In the case of structures that are presently covered with vinyl, aluminum, and pressed wood cosmetic cladding, the HPC may allow for a change to another substitute siding (such as fiber cement siding), if the proposed new siding is more in keeping with original appearance of the structure or the character of the district.

1. The appearance, surface textures, details, and other key visual characteristics of most substitute sidings are not appropriate in the historic district.

2. Vinyl,Aluminumaluminum, andPressedpressed wood shall not be used to cover or replace wood siding or brick structures that contribute to the character of the Historic District, or on new structures.

71

Porches and Entrances/Characteristics (2nd paragraph)

Porches are subject to more weathering and water damage than most other elements of historic houses. For repairs and alterations, use only woods that are naturally rot-resistant for exposed surfaces - railings, posts, steps, etc. - and use galvanized or stainless steel fasteners. Pressure-treated tongue and groove pine is appropriate for flooring if it is kiln-dried following treatment. Concealing framing members should be made of standard pressure-treated pine. Provide adequate foundation ventilation under porches. Appropriate designs for foundation vents are described in the foundations section of this chapter.

Porches and Entrances/Characteristics (2nd paragraph)

Porches are subject to more weathering and water damage than most other elements of historic houses. For repairs and alterations, use only woods or other appropriate materials approved by the Commission that are naturally rot-resistant for exposed surfaces-railings, posts, steps, etc.-and use galvanized or stainless steel fasteners. Pressure-treated tongue and groove pine is appropriate for flooring if it is kiln-dried following treatment. Concealing framing members should be made of standard pressure-treated pine. Provide adequate foundation ventilation under porches. Appropriate designs for foundation vents are described in the foundations section of this chapter.

98

Building Height/Scale (Guidelines)

7.2.2 Make the scale of the proposed building compatible with the scale of contributing structures on the block or side of street.

Building Height/Scale (Guidelines)

7.2.2 Make the scale of the proposed building compatible with the scale of contributing structures on the block or side of street. Calculations of the proposed new structure volume compared to the surrounding adjacent structures volumes may be used to demonstrate that the proposed structure is in balance with the scale of the existing contributing structures.

98

7.2.5 If a contributing building was demolished or moved from the site, design the replacement building to be of similar height, scale, massing and location as the previously existing building. Applicants will have a heavy burden to demonstrate to the HPC that a replacement structure with different height, scale, and massing as the previously existing building is incongruous with the Historic District.

7.2.5 If a contributing building was demolished or moved from the site, design the replacement building to be of similar height, scale, massing and location as the previously existing building. Applicants will have a heavy burden to demonstrate to the HPC that a replacement structure with different height, scale, and massing as the previously existing building isincongruous with the Historic District. (This guideline change was previously made by the HPC & BOC and will be changed in the revised text. That is the reason why it is shown here.)

99

Materials (Guidelines)

7.3.2 The use of substitute products such as vinyl, aluminum and pressed board siding and other modern day products marketed to imitate traditional building materials are not allowed. Smooth fiber cement siding may be used on a case by case basis. Use of fiber-cement lap siding may be approved for use on new structures. In all circumstances every effort shall be made to ensure that new structures and the application of modern day products achieve compatibility with existing historic buildings that define the character of the Beaufort Historic District.

Materials (Guidelines)

7.3.2 The use of substitute products such as vinyl, aluminum, and pressed board sidingand other modern day products marketed to imitate traditional building materialsare not allowed.Smooth fiber cement siding may be used on a case by case basis.Use of fiber-cementlapsiding may be approved for use on new structures. In all circumstances every effort shall be made to ensure that new structures and the application of modern day products achieve compatibility with existing historic buildings that define the character of the Beaufort Historic District.

99

(New guideline)

7.3.4 Vinyl clad and vinyl frame windows may be used in new construction provided that the surrounding window trim and the muntin pattern are appropriate to the architectural style and period of the structure. If the windows have divided lights they shall be either true divided lights (TDL) or three-dimensional grilles on both the interior and exterior sides (SDL). Snap-in grilles or grilles between the glass are not appropriate.

102

Additions to Historic Buildings Guidelines

7.8.4 Additions should be constructed so that they can be removed from the original building in that future without irreversible damage to significant features.

Additions to Historic Buildings Guidelines

7.8.4 Additions should be constructed so that they can be removed from the original building in that future without irreversible damage to significant features. Additions should be set in at least one foot (1’) to show a break between the original structure and the new addition.

102

7.8.5 Vinyl, aluminum, or pressed wood are not appropriate on additions to historic buildings. Other substitute siding may be allowed. (SEE SIDING GUIDELINES)

7.8.5 Vinyl, aluminum, or pressed wood are not appropriate on additions to historic buildings. Other substitute siding or trim approved by the Commission may be allowed (SEE SIDING GUIDELINES).

118

Signage (2nd paragraph)

In reviewing requests for a new sign, the Beaufort Historic Preservation Commission evaluates the material, location, size, style, color, graphics, support structure, and height of the proposed sign. As a general rule, new signage should be made of materials such as wood, metal, or stone. The sign should be placed so not to visually compete with the building or streetscape or damage or obscure character-defining architectural features of the building. For commercial building with a traditional storefront treatment, place signs in the designated signboard frieze above display windows. Importantly, the size of the sign should not visually overwhelm the building and its architectural details. For this reason, the HPC may require that a sign be smaller in size than the Beaufort Zoning Ordinance may allow.

Signage (2nd paragraph)

In reviewing requests for a new sign, the Beaufort Historic Preservation Commission evaluates the material, location, size, style, color, graphics, support structure, and height of the proposed sign. As a general rule,new signage should be made of materials such as wood, metal, or stone. The sign should be placed so as not to visually compete with the building or streetscape or damage or obscure character-defining architectural features of the building.and to ensure that the installation of the sign does not damage the historic fabric nor detract from the historic character of the historic district. For commercial building with a traditional storefront treatment, place signs in the designated signboard frieze above display windows. Importantly, the size of the sign should not visually overwhelm the building and its architectural details. Sign designs should be appropriate, integrated with, and harmonious to the buildings and sites which they occupy. For this reason, the HPC may require that a sign be smaller in size than the BeaufortZoningLand Development Ordinance may allow.

118

Signage (3rd paragraph)

New signage should be unobtrusive. Simple geometrical shapes are preferred to highly complex designs that draw attention to the sign rather than the architecture. Colors should harmonize with the color scheme of the building and the surrounding signs in the streetscape. Pastels and muted colors are recommended over primary colors. Graphics should be simple and legible. For easy reading, the lettering of the sign should contrast with the background of the sign. Free-standing signs should be no larger than necessary and should be mounted fairly low to the ground to avoid obstructing pedestrian view.

Signage (3rd paragraph)

New signage should be unobtrusive. Simple geometrical shapes are preferred to highly complex designs that draw attention to the sign rather than the architecture. While computer generated printing on signs is permissible, effects that could not have been generated by traditional hand painting or hand lettering (e.g. drop shadows, gradients, and textures) are discouraged. Colors should harmonize with the color scheme of the building and the surrounding signs in the streetscape. Pastels and muted colors are recommended over primary colors. Graphics should be simple and legible. For easy reading, the lettering of the sign should contrast with the background of the sign. Free-standing signs should be no larger than necessary and should be mounted fairly low to the ground to avoid obstructing pedestrian view.

119

Sign Guidelines

8.6.5 Use simple, clear graphics and lettering styles in sign design.

Sign Guidelines

8.6.5 Use simple, clear graphics and lettering styles which would traditionally have been available in hand-lettered signs in the overall sign design. In general, signs should have borders around the sign perimeter comprised of complementary colors from the lettering styles and graphic colors of the sign. Vinyl, self-adhesive letters and numerals shall not be used in the historic district.

119

8.6.9 The use of a sandwich board, back-to-back sign or V-board is allowed in the historic district on a limited basis and must not contribute to visual clutter of the streetscape nor impede the flow of pedestrain traffic. No more than one (1) sandwich board, back-t-back sign or V-board per business is allowed. Signs of either type must be considered as a portion of the overall allowable square footage for each individual building. The signs must conform to the basic guidelines for signage including color, material, style, graphics and placement. Sandwich boards, back-to-back boards or V-boards may not exceed twelve (12) square feet on either side, for a total of twenty-four (24) square feet for the whole sign. The sign may not exceed four (4) feet in height. Signs of this type must be removed from outside the location at the close of the business day. The use of plastic for sandwich boards, back-to-back signs or V-boards is not allowed.

8.6.9 The use of a sandwich board, back-to-back board,signorVv-board sign is allowed in the historic district on a limited basis and must not contribute to the visual clutter of the streetscape nor impede the flow ofpedestrainpedestrian traffic. No more than one (1) sandwich board, back-to-back board,signorVv-board sign per business is allowed. Signs ofeitherthese types must be considered as a portion of the overall allowable signage square footage for each individualbuildingproperty.TheSandwich board, back-to-back board, or v-board signs must conform to the basic guidelines for signage including color, material, style, graphics,and placement. Sandwich boards, back-to-back boards, orVv-boardssigns may not exceedtwelve (12)nine (9) square feet on either side,for a total oftwenty-four (24)eighteen (18) square feet for the whole sign. These signs may not exceed four (4) feet in height. Signs of this type must be removed from outside the location at the close of the business day. The use of plastic for sandwich boards, back-to-back board,signsor V-boardssigns is not allowed. These signs may not be adorned with any feature not authorized by the HPC through the Certificate of Appropriateness process. Any person erecting a sandwich board, back-to-back board, or v-board sign shall indemnify and hold harmless the Town of Beaufort and its officers, agents, and employees from any claim arising out of the presence of these signs on the Town of Beaufort property or rights-of-way. A copy of the sandwich board, back-to-back board, or v-board sign COA must be readily available for inspection. Town of Beaufort staff may move and/or remove sandwich board, back-to-back board, or v-board signs for municipal or safety purposes (i.e. traffic patterns, pedestrian issues, maintenance, etc.).

119

(New guideline)

8.6.10 Minimize the total number of signs on a structure to reduce the visual clutter of the streetscape. Ideally a business should have just one large display sign but a much smaller secondary sign may be permitted on a case by case basis.

119

(New guideline)

8.6.11 When a building includes multiple businesses, a master sign plan shall be developed for the entire property to guide individual design and location decisions. A master sign plan should specify the location, number, and size of all signs on the property. A master sign plan shall make all signs on the building cohesive, linking one to another, ultimately creating a central theme for the site.